Why you need some kind of version of the Photoshop app for modern shutterbug antics. . .


I'm not trying to sell Photoshop just for the sake of selling Photoshop, since I don't really have any financial incentive to be doing so (although it would be greatly appreciated if I was able to get something in the way of that). But I can't stress enough how essential Photoshop is for any serious modern shutterbug antics. Sure it's possible to completely transform a picture way beyond its original context using Photoshop, however what most people would probably be interested in is the kinds of refinements that can be made to pictures in order to add that polish and pop where a lack of decent camera, ability or just even fortunate circumstance might have ruined a potentially good picture. Take the three following examples, the pictures were sent from my Missus using an iPhone 3G. Not the greatest of camera's to begin with let alone the lack of features and controls to manually tweak the sensor and lens to achieve intentionally better results of the measured kind for various styles. But even these pictures can be made to appear semi-decent using Photoshop, so imagine what could be possible with a little intentional application and some decent purpose made snapper gear. The font in this first body of text is grey only for reason of stopping the temporary visual traces of white text remaining on your retina and making the following pictures temporarily difficult to see after reading what was originally much brighter text.

Eksovichea Tito Hak 

Original iPhone 3G capture 

Photoshop edit 

Original iPhone 3G capture

 Photoshop edit 

 Original iPhone 3G capture

  Photoshop edit 

Ok so the three examples have also had some artificial depth of field blur added to them for extra visual impact because the camera on the iPhone does in fact physically lack the type of lens needed to create any usable depth of field blur. I might also add that the artificially added thing isn't as good as the real thing with uniquely achievable bokeh results depending on the type of lens you use. Even without the use of artificial bokeh there's still plenty that can be done with colour balance, contrast, and colour saturation either as a whole or in isolated sections to further refine images and add that extra polish.

Fortunately Photoshop 9 (CS2) pretty much has all the stuff that most people would need to achieve the same type of results. The only downside is that Photoshop 9 (CS2) doesn't natively handle RAW files like the later versions of Photoshop, which isn't too much of a problem if you're exclusively working with JPG files. However if RAW is a definite must you could quite easily use something like FSviewer (which is free and does have native RAW preview features) to preview, manage, pre-edit (the main RAW file handling feature you want from FSviewer) and export RAW files to JPG format for editing in Photoshop 9 (CS2). (which is basically exactly the same workflow you would use in later versions of Photoshop with a RAW plugin despite in this instance using a none Adobe brand FSviewer app instead for initial RAW image file pre-editing and exporting to JPG for additional editing in Photoshop 9 CS2).


You can get Photoshop 9 (CS2) for free here and FSviewer here.


Other stuff you can do with photoshop 

 
Make a Free Website with Yola.