I'm usually more of a passive observer in the whole climate change vs. global warming debate which is down to the fact that I'd spent most of my time in a place which for now could be considered to be a more temperate region of the world. About the only thing that I'd experienced were a few abnormally warm summers in the few years toward the end of my stay in the North West of England and declines in the  frequency of "White Christmas' " despite them pretty much being quite a regular occurrence during my youth. Despite all the disasters making the news globally whilst debates over the impact of humans on the environment were being bandied about the UK pretty much stay quiet temperate despite the more seemingly anomalous fluctuations. That’s to say that the UK did have it's share of seeming natural disasters with cases of anomalous sever flash flooding also affecting areas of the UK, but having not looked into the patterns and history of disasters caused by whether for past few hundred years I'm in no position to say whether it's something that could have been expected or not. However as we all know "climate change" is a natural phenomena but the problem is that it has much longer definitive cycled patterns that span millennia despite the seeming severity of fluctuation within the last 30 years globally.



Physics, man made planes, computers, satellites, the weather etc...  

The bottom line is without being able to see accurate recorded evidence for the past few thousands it’s a little difficult to say how much of the recent whether related disasters can actually be attributed to effects of climate change (not the direct result of more recent modern human activity through the more publicized and not so publicized through "technological progression")  but no doubt it will have some kind of impact depending at which part of the long term cycle of climate change we're at. Of course the impact of humans will obviously have an effect but no doubt there this could be interpreted in a number of ways against considerations of consumption, waste production and the technological in various contexts.  What might also be considered to be a major step in human advancement in our technological  abilities to peg us onto the next level civilization advancement might be a little miss-placed given how "ironing out the bugs" so far have gone unless that is the "beating wing" hiccups have been intentional for various other worldly reasons. But if not we might need some more powerful whether modeling machine to avoid the need to do such "ironing" in the first place.



Simple things...

I guess it stands to reason but usually the places at which these weather related disasters occur are generally the places that people, policy makers and general folk involved in the process of decision making regarding city and town planning should avoid building to begin with if not actually move from them. Sure this is obviously something that seems to be a little more difficult for people to do in more developed regions of the world where people are evidently going to be a little more stubborn/reluctant to leave or uproot for the sake common sense and rising insurance premiums against the actual reality of the increased frequency of such disasters causing weather to become such disruptive mass events for whatever reason. But its beyond me why regions in the process of rebuilding and yet to be sectioned for new development such as Cambodia don't take this into account with the increased frequency of cases of severe flooding over the past 30 or so years in order to minimize damage, loss and the obstruction of progress caused such an increased frequency of flooding on top of the average rising water levels to have been recorded annually.  Especially when Cambodia doesn't currently have the funding or financial ability to build the appropriate long term, reliable and maintainable anti-flooding measures at is disposal. Surely it would be a lot cheaper and to really carefully consider locations for new intercity, national transport routes and building developments in places where the ground elevation would be well beyond any danger of flood risk??